The 5 Best Password Managers for 2021

If you had to guess how many passwords you use in your daily life, what would you say? Thirty? Forty? 

Believe it or not, the average person has 100 passwords to remember.

How can anyone keep track of all these? A lot of people (maybe yourself included) use the password manager that comes with their preferred internet browser, just for the sake of convenience. And that’s an OK choice, as long as you don’t mind leaving your accounts wide open to anyone who gets access to your device. (And that’s just one of the reasons why free browser password managers are a no-go.) 

Does that mean you should just go the old-fashioned route of keeping a hundred sticky notes with all your passwords jotted on them? Of course not. 

In this day and age, the best way to safeguard your passwords and keep them handy at all times is with a dedicated password manager. Unlike browser password managers and your trusty sticky notes, third-party password managers are built by experts whose number one priority is your privacy and security. They make your life easier by:

  • Remembering all your passwords for you
  • Generating unique, strong passwords whenever you need them
  • Syncing across all your devices
  • Making it so you only have to remember one “master” password

There are several options out there to choose from, so we’ve made it easier for you to navigate your choices by rounding up our top 5 best password managers for 2021. 

Get started now with a free trial of TeamPassword to enjoy the peace of mind of knowing your passwords are safe and secure. 

1. TeamPassword

TeamPassword has all the essential functionality you’d expect of any good password manager: it generates strong passwords that can’t be easily hacked, has options for two-step authentication, uses encrypted connections to keep your passwords safe and secure, and performs regular vulnerability sweeps to stop malware and spyware in its tracks. Plus, it works with any browser (Chrome, Firefox, Safari, etc.). 

Where TeamPassword really stands out, though, is in its options for sharing and collaborating in groups. This is just as useful in the office for group projects as it is for families who share access to online accounts. 

The user-friendly dashboard allows users to track who logged in where and when, so if you ever need to know the details of a login, it’s all right there at your fingertips. It’s also super simple to add or remove user passwords, which makes it great for collaborations—once a person is off a project (such as external vendors or partners) and no longer needs access, you can just remove them and maintain your security. For the ultimate peace of mind, you can elect to receive email notifications for specific user activities so you’re alerted whenever a new member joins a group or a login gets deleted. 

Sign up for a free trial to protect your accounts with the top password manager of 2021. 

The Good:

  • Superior collaboration functions
  • Easy-to-use dashboard
  • Tracking features that make user activity crystal clear

The Bad:

  • The range of options can be overwhelming

2. 1Password

1Password has received a lot of buzz, especially from Apple enthusiasts. It doesn’t have a free version, so you don’t have the option of a “test drive,” so to speak. Although the design and user interface aren’t the most up-to-date, this solution still offers a lot in terms of storing your passwords safely and security, filling in forms quickly and easily, working across several browser types, and utilizing two-factor authentication. 

The Travel Mode function lets you temporarily get rid of stored passwords, which makes it particularly useful for people who travel a lot and don’t want to open their digital worlds to customs agents at every border they cross. Biometric login is another cool feature that increases security and peace of mind. 

The Good:

  • Travel Mode protects you when crossing borders
  • Organizational tools offer convenience

The Bad:

  • Design and interface could be better

3. Lastpass

Lastpass has a ton of great features that are easy to use. In the past, you could access most of these features in their free version (including the ultra-convenience of being able to sync your passwords across all your devices), but they’ve adjusted their plans and pricing to make most of the good stuff only available to paid subscribers. 

With the paid version, you get unlimited syncing, a decent amount of online file storage, two-factor-authentication keys, and monitoring of your accounts to keep them off the dark web. The best part is that you don’t need to install a dedicated application on your computer—browser extensions and the web interface have you covered. 

The Good:

  • Supports two-factor-authentication 
  • User-friendly design 

The Bad:

  • Minimal stand-alone desktop apps 
  • Free version is disappointing and limited

4. RoboForm

RoboForm is one of the OGs of cybersecurity, with its first version going back to the 90s. It has kept pace with the times, although we wouldn’t say it’s leading the pack when it comes to its web interface and mobile app. One area where it does shine brighter than the rest is in its form-filling ability, which has always been RoboForm’s calling card. 

RoboForm lets you share passwords, generate new passwords, and protect yourself with two-factor authentication. It has a decent free version, and the paid version comes in under what basically every other competitor charges, which makes it a great value for people who just want a solid, basic password manager without too much fuss. 

The Good:

  • Superior form filling
  • Good value

The Bad:

  • Outmatched by peers when it comes to features

5. KeePass

DIY-ers have their dream password manager in KeePass. This is the only option on our list of best password managers to be absolutely 100% free, and that may be because you have to do most of the heavy lifting yourself to take advantage of it. 

The desktop app is specific to Windows but will also play well with Mac and Linux if you know how to tinker a bit. Syncing is also in your hands, and you have your pick of using OneDrive, Dropbox, or other online accounts to get everything sorted. Techies will relish the challenge, but the typical user may give up in exasperation. 

The Good:

  • Free and open source

The Bad:

  • Needs some technical know-how

Choosing the best password manager for your needs

We hope this rundown helps clarify your options and gets you geared up to start enjoying the peace of mind that comes from knowing your passwords are being protected. 

It’s simple to get started. Begin protecting your valuable information with a free trial of TeamPassword one of the best password managers on the market today.